Reflections of Home~

Every odd number year I have looked forward to the last week of July….this year is extra special.

In days I will be traveling to the place I have called home for 58 years though I left there over 50 years ago. I will be going home to Boys Town, NE. Though I graduated in 1968 since there are reunions back on campus only every odd year; thus will be joining brothers of the classes of 1968/1969 to commemorate our 50th high school graduation anniversary.

As the travel day approaches it has been a time of reflection for me. I have no idea how many more times I have to make this journey home thus memories have come flooding back.

I think of the mentors who took an angry scared kid of 11 and helped him take what he had experienced the first 11yrs of life behind him and to move forward. Memories comeback to time spent to name a few; Msgr. Wegner, Msgr. Schmidt, Moe Genevieve Condon….who saw something positive in my always wanting to argue took me to Clarence Weinerth…my debate/speech coach the last two years at BT. All have since passed and whom I never had the opportunity to say thank you. I think of Dr. Patrick McGinnis, who still is with us and whom I have been able to thank. Each of these men played a role in making me who I am today and the lessons given by them remain with me today.

I had no self confidence and pretty much hated the world for the 1st 11 yrs of my life. Without having gone to BT and had these intervene in my life I would have never realized that hey I could carry a tune, I would have never realized that I had an ability to write…since then I have written 2 books and write for a number of on line publications, through debate I realized I had an ability to speak/advocate for foster care reform before folks…since then I have spoken to groups around the country (small & large) and have spoken to 3 World Conferences in Boston, Atlanta & The Hague Netherlands and I was able to found a small foundation foster youth called Hope & Dignity Project. Boys Town most importantly made me realize I was not the failure so many folks told me I would be before BT. If Boys Town had had not been a part of my history I strongly believe none of the above would have been accomplished!

The memories that I value most is the brotherhood of friendships made during 7 plus year at Boys Town who remain friends until this very day…many who I will be seeing on this journey home. Unfortunately the 3 closest friends made during those years will not be with me in person for this commemoration but will surely be with me in strongly spirit: James Acklin, Renato Korus and John Gallagher…these were not only fellow class of 68 members but were friends and even more I considered as brothers I never had…I miss each of them.

I want all I come in contact with to know the story of Boys Town and what it did not only for this one time kid but for the thousands of not only brothers but sisters as well the past 40 plus years. Boys Town has changed since my days but its mission continues to help young men/women be the best they can be!

Years at Boys Town had its ups and down as has life afterwards but I was taught it doesn’t matter if one falls but it does matter it you get up not and how they get up.. People mentioned here and not mentioned each played a role taking that angry, scared kid of 11 to the self confident, hopefully caring man I am approaching the age of 70.

I will, no matter how I might try, ever be able to repay Boys Town for what they did for me. I have been able to volunteer in various alumni activities over the years and even been privileged the past 4 years to serve on the Boys Town National Alumni Association Board of Directors…the past 3 as Vice President…hope in some small way I help make the association better for the future generations of alumni. I step down from this position during this trip giving another alumnus the opportunity to serve.

I will always be grateful to Boys Town, the brotherhood of brothers and most importantly I will always call it home….I look forward to the journey home next week!

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Miracle at 100 Years

On a wintry day in Omaha, Nebraska a young priest had a dream. He wanted to start a place that would provide a home for young boys in need.

Fr. Edward Joseph Flanagan founded world renowned Boys Town, Nebraska on December 12, 1917.

One hundred years later that dream continues to live on!

I doubt seriously he would have imagined what he began that day would go on to provide a home, education, sports and so much more for thousands of young men; and years later young women.

What began as a dream which for years struggled day to day to survive financially went forth. It was because of his perseverance and faith that God would provide that kept him going forward….never doubting that somehow things would workout.

With the help of a few priests, nuns and a few others he moved from a building that limited him to care but for a few to what was once farm land to become a village called Boys Town.

Thousands have been a part of the history of Boys Town. Today many of the young men/women who once called Boys Town home are now priests, lawyers, doctors, teachers, politicians, barbers, printers…etc. Each having gained a second chance at life and making the most of what they obtained.

They learned the three priorities of life….faith, country and family!

Hundreds of young men/women have joined our military. Boys Town probably has the most names on a Memorial Wall for those who gave their all in service to our country of any small village in the country as they have served in every war beginning in WWll to day. Each are honored and revered by Boys Town alumni and staff as heroes!

Many for years have been doing what has become fashionable today…paying it forward. It took many donations for each to call the place of Boys Town home for brief time or many years…they have spent years in their own way giving back to the communities they now call home in thanksgiving.

Fr. Flanagan has been declared a “Servant of God” and now is being investigated for miracles to see whether the Catholic Church will one day declare him a Saint.

It is unfortunate the church looks for physical healing miracles before declaring one a saint. For I know thousands of life changing miracles that would not have happened if a young priest did not have a dream 100 years ago.

I know it because I am one of those miracles! It was my physical home from 1961-1968. In my heart it remains my home still today.

Fr. Flanagan passed away suddenly May 15, 1948 while in Germany for President Harry S. Truman helping youth after WWll. His miracle lives on and he rests in peace at his beloved Boys Town. Four successors and many staff over the years have worked to see his work continues.

Boys Town celebrates the 100th anniversary of its founding! My wish that 100 years from now they will celebrate the 200th one!

Thank you Fr. Flanagan and Boys Town for all you have done for the thousands of us youth in the past and for all you will continue to do in the years ahead!

Lawrence Adams
Proud Graduate of Boys Town Class of 1968

Memorial Book: Victims of the Persecution of Jews under the National Socialist Tyranny in Germany 1933 – 1945

IN MEMRORIUM

This is a difficult blog for me to write for today 11/15/15 as for the first time ever I saw photos of a few of my ancestors. Unfortunately three of the four people in the photos were of those lost during the Holocaust. To see their photos and know what happened to them was heartbreaking and brought tears to my eyes. I also found out one that survived passed away only seven years ago…if I had only researched my paternal side earlier I may have been able to meet her.

The black/white photos of the people in this blog were either from Yad Vashem or from the private collection of Anita Herze Jorg.

Eleven members of my family (that I know of as of this date) were taken from their homes, seven were killed in the Holocaust and four survived.

Through the above book I was able to find exactly what happened to those that died, two that survived. I found information on two others that survived by visiting a web site from Kaiserslautern, Germany web site pages dedicated to each family member with Stolpersteine (stumbling stones) dedicated on July 10, 2014 at the last address where they were free at  Rudolph-Breitscheid-Str. 71, Kaiserslautern. Two currently have testimonials for them in Yad Veshem and I will be submitting them for the remainder over the next few weeks.

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Rudolph-Breitscheid-Str, 71 pinpointed on the city map

02her_all_stHere are their stories and photos for those I have today. The daughter of one who survived still is living and I have written to the resource I found to see if I will be able to contact her as well as see the interview done with her father Erich Herze back in 1994 before he passed. Yes, I have hope to see more photos especially of ancestors that go back before the generations on this blog.

Geissmann, Hedwig: born Hedwig Jakob, sister of Johanna Jakob Herze, 1st cousin twice removed

Born: January 24, 1882 in Essweiler/Kusel/Bayern/Pfalz, resident of Kaiserlautern

Married: on 10/02/1912 to Silvan Geissman in Essweiler, he died in service in during WWl

Deportation from: Baden/Pfalz/Saarland

10/20/1940 Gurs internment camp

02/21/1941 Recebedou internment camp

08/03/1942 Drancy collecting detention camp

Murdered:  08/12/1942 Auschwitz extermination camp

Herze, Johanna: born Johanna Jakob, sister of Hedwig Jakob Geissman, 1st cousin  twice removed….daughter of Lazarus Jakob/Barbara Franck…my 2x great aunt/uncle

Born: February 15, 1874 in Essweiler/Kusel/Bayern/Pfalz, resident of Kaiserlautern

Married: on  10/24/1894 in Essweiler moved to Kaisrslautern in 1902

Deportation from: Baden/Pfalz/Saarland

10//20/1940 Gurs internment camp

02/21/1941 Noe internment camp

Murdered:  03/05/1943 Noe internment camp

Herze, Hugo: husband of Johanna Jakob Herze my 1st cousin twice removed

Born: 07/29/1870 in Randerath / Geilenkirchen / Rheinprovinz

Married: 10/24/1894 in Essweiler & moved to Kaiserslautern in 1902

Deportation from: Badem/Pfalz/Saarland

10/20/1940 Gurs internment camp

02/21/1941 Noe interment camp

Murdered:  02/07/1943 Noe internment camp

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Johanna & Hugo Herze-1935 Kaiserlautern

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The marker at Camp Gurs of entrance memorializes those who entered on 10/22/1940 and were murdered, including 5 members of my family

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Hugo & Johanna appear on the 2nd column…whoever visits will have to remember them!

Franck, Auguste:

Born 07/08/1878 in Essweiler/Kusel/Bayern/Pfalz resident of Koln son of Herman Franck/Ester Moses…Herman brother of  Joseph Franck my 3x great grandfather 3rd great uncle

Deportation: 06/12/1942 Theresienstadt, ghetto

Murdered: 07/05/1942 Theresienstadt, ghetto

Herze, Adolph: son of Hugo/Johanna Herze, 2nd cousin two times removed

Born: 12/13/1896 Essweiler/Kusel/Bayern/Pfalz

Married: Rosa Lazar…date not as yet verified

Escape: Adolph & Rosa escaped to Brussels, Belgium

Deported: to Dusseldorf

Deported: 12/11/1941 to Riga

Murdered: 03/06/1943 Riga Jungfernof Aussbenlager ghetto

Herze, Rosa: born Rosa Lazar wife of Adolph Herze

Born: 08/01/1902 Kaiserslautern/Bayern.Pfalz

Escaped: to Brussels, Belgium with husband

Deported to Dusseldorf

Deported: 12/11/1941 to Riga

SURVIVED:…went to Hamburg, Germany after liberation, immigrated to the United States in December 1946

RosaLazarus

Rosa Lazar Herze immigration papers into United States

Herze, Hannilore: daughter of Jacob/Lydia Horn Herze….Jacob is son of Hugo/Johanna Herze…Hannilore, 3rd cousin once removed

 Born:07/13/1933 Kaiserslautern/Bayern/Plafz and lived there

Deported: 10/22/1940 from Baden/Plafz/Saarland to Gurs interment camp

Murdered: 08/1/1940 Gurs internment camp

Herze, Hedwig: daughter of Jacob/Lydia, sister of Hannalore Herze 3rd cousin once removed

Born: on 01/23/1931 Kaiserslautern before the marriage of her parents, though her mother was Catholic she was officially listed as Jewish

Deported: 10/22/1940 from Baden/Plafz/Saarland to Gurs internment camp

Moved: 02/26/1941 to Aspet (Haute Garonne) with 49 other children from the OSE (Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants) of Gurs in the children’s home Maison des Pupilles

SURVIVED: On 28 January 1948 she returned to Kaiserslautern, where on 08/27/1949 she married Oskar LF Ebling, they had two children. She died in Kaiserslautern 1974.

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Hedwig with younger sister Hannalore-1935 Kaiserslautern

Hedwig

Hedwig in orphanage (far right)

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Hedwig in orphanage (front 6th in from right)

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Hedwig: Hannalore has been murdered and Ruth moved…she is alone:note the star of David having to be worn

Herze, Jacob: son of Hugo/Johana Herze, 2nd cousin twice removed

Born: 02/13/1901 Neukirchen/Daun/Rheinprovinz lived in Kaiserslautern

Married: Lydia Horn

Imprisoned: 11/12/1938-12/10/1938 Dachau concentration camp for protection (?)

Deported:  10//22/1940 Baden/Plaz/Saarland Gurs internment camp

Murdered 04/27/1941 Gurs internment camp

camp-de-gurs

Camp Gurs Cemetery for the 1017 murdered here: Hugu & Hannalore Herze, both of whom died here in 1941, rest here and as people walk through the markers each will be remembered as will the other 1015

Herze, Lydia: born Lydia Horn

Born: March 29, 1912 in Kusel, daughter of Michael and Katharina Horn, family was Roman Catholic

Married: 06/06/1931 to Jacob Herze in Kaiserslautern and lived there

Deported: 10.22.1940 Baden/Plafz/Saarland….this after repeated request on the part of official bodies to renounce her Jewish husband, Lydia refused. She was sent back from Gurs to Kaiserslautern, where she was obliged to do forced labor and lived on February 5, 1943 to October 7, 1944 in the basement Straße 9, with her mother. Between October 1944 and July 1945, after escaping Kaiserslautern, she lived in Hamburg.

SURVIVED: She remarried on 03/29/1960 to Kurt Nagel, Lydia died on 08/16/1992 in Kaiserslautern.

Herze, Ruth, Renee: daughter of Jacob/Lydia Herze,  3rd cousin once removed

Born: 06/30/1939 Kaiserslautern/Bayern/Plafz and lived there

Deported: 10/22/1940 Baden/Plafz/Saarland to Gurs inernment camp, The 16-month-old girl Ruth was the youngest ever transported to Gurs

Moved: The one and a half year old Ruth was brought by Blanche Raphael, pediatric nurse and Max Teichert to a children’s home to Limoges, France. They became her foster parents.

SURVIVED: Ruth knew a long time nothing about their origins and about the fact that both her mother and her sister were still alive. Erich Herze, the youngest brother of Jacob their father, finally found her and contacted her.. Mediated by Erich Herze her mother Lydia traveled to Limoges in 1950 to bring her youngest daughter home with her. This, however, was thwarted by the foster parents.

The relationship between Ruth Herze and her birth mother remained difficult, however, she had good contact with her older sister Hedwig and her uncle Erich, she visited him often in Malmö, Sweden, where he had fled in 1939. Around 1960 Ruth moved to Nimes and learned the profession of pediatric nurse. She then moved to Boulogne near Paris and later by Cagnes-sur-Mer near Nice, where she died of 2008.

Two children Erich Herze and Wilhelm Herze fled Kaiserslautern in 1939. Erich fled to Malmo, Sweden where he married had at least one child, a daughter. He died during a visit to Kaiserslautern with his daughter in 1999 and was returned to Malmo, Sweden for burial. Wilhelm immigrated to the United States, to Argentina. to Paraguay where he died in 1986.

This is the Synagogue the Herze family attended in Kaiserslautern from 1902 until 1938 when it was destroyed to make a parade ground for the Nazis:

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Replica of Synagogue entrance memorial built in Kaiserslautern by the Jewish community

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Plaque at the memorial entrance showing before and after destruction

A human being is forgotten until his name is not forgotten!

Family Persecuted & Survived or Killed During the Horror of the Nazis

Before I remember and honor family members who suffered & survived, were murdered or successfully fled elsewhere I need to give a short background as to why at age 65 I am just learning of this horror.

I was born of an unwed mother in 1950 and placed for adoption; though never adopted. I went through the first 36 years of life not knowing who was my was or any of my heritage. I would find my birth mother in 1986 and learn I was Polish and in 1990 I would find my birth father and learn on his side I was German.

I began tracing back the history, etc of my maternal side and spent over the next 25 years being able to trace back to my maternal great, great grandparents in the mid 1800’s in Poland. Though much of the family who were born in the USA in the late 1800’s had passed I was able to meet and develop relationships with many cousins. I hit a brick wall in tracing back about two years ago and decided at least for now to lay things aside.

My birth mother and father have since passed.

For unexplainable reasons I throughout the years never had an interest in doing this on my father’s side.

I early April of this year, again for unexplainable reason I pulled what little information I had on my father’s side and decided it was time!

I of course knew since 1990 that his family was German. Through various record searches I learned of names his parents. It was through his father’s name I learned of his grandparents: Albert Marx & Fannie Jakoby Marx who had immigrated from Germany in the late 1800‘s.

I then discovered something I had not expected….they were Jewish and that line went back many generations. I was raised Catholic though I cannot say I have been a practicing one for several years but do have solid beliefs. I wanted to know more of the Jewish faith, their traditions and of course go back further in the family line. Because the mother of a child must before the child is born be Jewish for the child to be declared Jewish I cannot do so as my grandfather though Jewish married a Gentile who did not convert before he was born or even after. I may not be Jewish but a Jewish line runs deeply through my veins!

On one great grandmother’s side I found her parents were Nathan Jakoby of Barweiler German where he was born, married, lived , died in 1880 and is buried and his wife Rosina Josephina Franck of Essweiler Germany then Wallerfangen where she moved after Nathan passed and where she passed in 1893 and is buried in Dillingen. All but one of their children immigrated to the USA except Leopold who passed in Barweiler at the age of 16 in 1878. I have traced each of the children and have most of their records.

This finally brings me to the events of the past few days and the reason for this special blog.
After waiting for information from Germany over the summer and early fall I did get bits of information from a friend in Germany but just Sunday I received pages involving my family line from the Civil Registry of Essweiler.

From that listing of names, births, marriages, deaths (over 50 names) were obtained. I also received a link to the Municipality of Essweiler web site and the initial shock came. I of course grew up learning of the horrors of Nazism and the Holocaust but never could have imagined it had affected anyone in my family….I was wrong, very wrong!

I shared this information in a blog on Monday so if someone might be looking also for names I have they could find them and I share the link to that blog here once again:

https://prairieguy.wordpress.com/2015/10/27/jewish-german-heritage-i-didnt-know-i-had/

The Franck family had lived in Essweiler at least from the mid 1700’s. They were homeowners who lived in the same house from my 4x great grandparents and passed to the 3x great grandparents….many children were born in that house identified only as #68 City Center. (4x great grandparents were Joel Franck/Eva Frankel & 3x great grandparents were Joseph Franck/Rosina Wolf).

One of the children Joseph/Rosina had was Barbara Franck…this is in addition to my 2x great grandmother and 4 other children.

Barbara Franck married on 05/25/1874 married Lazarus Jakob in Essweiler and had 7 children: Johanna, Hedwig, Rosalia, Ida, Flora, Paulina and a male not named who died at birth. Barbara was Lazarus’s 2nd wife and his 1st wife Susanna (Barbara’s sister) had passed during the birth of her 3rd child who also passed in 1873. Susanna also had 2 children prior but who had passed within months of their birth. Thus no previous children came into Lazarus’s/Barbara’s marriage.

This Tuesday night I found the two records I hoped to never find and I am sure will impact me in many ways for the rest of my days….my family was very personally impacted by the Holocaust.

The two records: Hedwig Jakob and Johanna Jakob Herze.

Hedwig was born in Essweiler on 01/24/1882. She would marry Silvian Geissiman 10/02/1912 in Kaiserslautern, Germany, b: 02/08/1882 in Westhoven, daughter of Issak Gerissman & Babette Picard. I have found no information as yet of her husband or if they had any children.

1. Hedwig was deported to Gurs Camp in France in 1940 then Auschwitz in 1942 where she met her death in the gas chambers of Hitler on 08/12/1942. There is no record for her on Yad Vashem but I will be submitting testimony on behalf of the family and I want her remembered by the world after I am gone.

2. Johanna Jakob Herze was born to Lazarus Jakob and Barbara Franck in Essweiler on 09/15/1874. She would marry Hugo Herze born on July 29 1870 Randerath, a district of Heinsberg, in North Rhine-Westphalia in Essweiler on 10/24/1894. They would initially live in Essweiler where 3 children were born then move to Kasiserlautern to 71 Lutpoldstrasse in 1902 now known as 71 Rudolf-Breitscheid Strasse…you will see the importance of this address later.

Children:

Leo, Adolph, Arthur, ,Jacob, Wilhelm, Hedwig (but called Heidi) and Erich…Leo died of natural causes in 1914)

Johanna was deported to the Gurs Camp in France, then transport to Camp Noe in October of 1940, as were most Jews in the town, where she was killed in 1943.

At this point I was in such pain learning of this and yes tears were flowing. I thought I would give up my research for the night but then I realized I had to go on. The pain and heartache would only become worse as I processed.

3. I learned her husband Hugo was also deported to the Gurs Camp then to Camp Noe…. and was killed there on February 4, 1943…Johanna was killed on March 5, 1943. They were 72 and 69 respectively when killed.

Son Jacob married Lydia Horn in 1931 in Essweiler then moved to Kaiserlautern and had 4 children: Hedwig, Hannalore, Anna and Ruth. Anna died of natural causes in 1939 at 3 ½ years old.

The entire family was deported to Camp Gurs in October 22, 1940.

4. Jacob was killed on April 14, 1941
5. Hannalore was killed in October 1941.

Lydia would survived and while doing forced labor she escaped and in 1945 was living in Hamburg, Germany but then returned to Kaiserslautern where she died in 1962 at age 60.

Hedwig survived the war and was rescued by OSE and the Quakers eventually also returning to Kaiserslautern where she passed…am researching for the year.

Ruth also survived but did not return home, she lived the remainder of her life in various locations in France as a pediatric nurse. She never married and died in 2008 at 89 years of age.

5. Johanna’s son Adolph born in 1896 married Rosa Lazar and lived in Reydt, Germany but fled to Brussels, Belgium. Adolph died in the ghettos of Riga. Adolph was shot and killed by the Nazis when it was ordered to clean out the Riga ghetto. Rosa eventually immigrated to the New York USA to live with her brother Solomon in Queens.

Hugo, Johannna, Hannalore, Jacob, Lydia, Adolph are listed in Yad Vashem but I will submit testimony for each of them. On behalf of the family and so their lives will never be forgotten.

Johanna’s 3 other sisters had left Germany back in the early 1930’s before Hitler came to power and immigrated to the United States and I need to do further research.

Johanna’s other children did survive the war:

Arthur died in 1940 in a hospital in Cologne, Germany

Wilhelm initially fled first to Paris, then Paraguay where he died in 1986.

Hedwig (Heidi) returned to Kaiserslautern where she died.

Erich fled to Sweden where he lived the remainder of his life. He did return for visits to Kaiserslautern but never wanted to resettle there. I need to research further ass I know he did marry but have no further information.

I have many other family names to search, some males that should be easy to check Yad Vesham whereas the women may be difficult as I don’t know if they ever married. I pray I won’t find anymore horror as this journey uncovered but I am prepared for it.

Besides submitting testimony for each of those that died to Yad Vesham I will also make memorials at FindaGrave for those who passed in Auschwitz, Noe and Gurs as I know these are there final resting places.

There is a custom called STOLPERSTEINE that began after the was as a way to remember those lost during the Holocaust.

A human being is forgotten until his name is not forgotten

The words from the Talmud are the driving force for the artist Gunter Demnig, with memorial plaques to the victims of the Nazi regime in Europe to for the world to remember. Under this slogan were in June 2014 Gunter Demnig outside the house Rudolf-Breitscheid-Strasse 71, where the Herze family last lived freely all together, placed the seven stumbling blocks for Hugo, Johanna, Jacob, Lydia, Hedwig, Ruth and Hannelore.

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A closer view so one can see the names:

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Though all but Hedwig Jakob are listed in Yad Vashem only one actual testimony has been received which is for Adolph Herze:

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I would love one day, and dream about it, to visit the land of my paternal ancestors especially Essweiler, Barweiler, Kaisterslautern. To walk where they walked, lived and also where some are buried in the Jewish cemetery in Hintzinger. And to personally go to honor those who suffered so much even if they did in fact survive as I know their lives were never the same and mine will not be either. But being now 65 and limited income that will never be possible…but I can dream.

For 65 years I did not know if the Jewish heritage I came from. I did not know the horrors some of my family endured, even death, for just being who they were. I knew of the Holocaust but now I know it personally. The heartache I felt Sunday night when I found the initial record then the succeeding ones on Tuesday night into those early hours of Wednesday may subside as time passes but it will never be healed. I have had to stop a few times as I writing it as the tears so easily came. I will never forget and hope that even after I am gone people will see the Stolpersteine created to honor them, the 2 two blogs I have written that are now part of the Internet, the testamonies that will be left on Yad Vashem and will remember and honor them.

It has been said all my life “NEVER AGAIN” but it has happened again and in places around the world people continue killing people by the thousands because of who they are….humankind I hope will someday make this saying real and not just words.

Shalom my family and may each of you rest in peace as well as all who endured the horror of the Nazis!

Jewish German Heritage I Didn’t Know I had!

I did not know my birth parents growing up as I was given for adoption at birth. In 1986 I found my birth mother and in 1990 my birth father. I knew she was Polish and he German. I spent several years researching the maternal; side of the family but let the paternal side lay aside.

For some reason I cannot fully explain I picked up the search of the paternal side this past April. I found out his side was not only German but came from a long line of the Jewish faith. This began an extensive search as I wanted to know more, much much more!

Before stating the results I should let you now that the Jewish line died when my paternal grandfather married a gentile who did not convert prior to my father’s birth (nor ever) thus though I have a very long Jewish blood line I cannot claim to be Jewish as this is passed from the mother not the father.

Here is what I have been able to put together since April…with most being detailed/verified by the Civil Registry of Essweiler, Germany:

4th Great Grandparents:

Joel Franck b: 1748, Haidenfallt, Germany
d: 01/22/1836 Essweiler, Germany

Married: Eva Frankel b: 1767. Hundsbach, Germany
d: 06/14/1832 Essweiler, Germany

FranckHome

The Franck family lived in the since mid 1770’s until early 1900’s: order of homes from left…Franck, Wolf and Leob. Photo provided by the Essweiler Town Hall, a person also went out to the site last week to take a photo of the site today…the Franck and Wolf homes are no more though the Leob remains.

FranckHome1

They had 3 children:

1. Joseph Franck b: 01/17/1799, Hundsbach, Germany (3rd Great Grandfather)
d: 06/10/1872 Essweiler, Germany (see 2 marriages below) buried HinzweilerGermany….Jewish Cemetery Essweiler established. His tombstone is described by a photographer as: Joseph Frank – 10/6/1872: Von Esweiller, Stein mi Rundbogigen Abschlus auf Vorderseite im oberin Teil drei sechsblattrige Blumen (Rossetten) und eine x – formige Vergerung. Only 36 of the tombstones remain and are deteriorating quickly.

2. Moses Franck b: 08/28/1803, Neunkircher, Germany (3rd Great Uncle)
d: 01/20/1885, Essweiler, Germany

Married Johannetta Feibt on 05/11/1830 b:01/04/1804 Spendlingen, Germany d: 04/06/1851 Essweiler, Germany

She would give birth to 8 children ALL in Essweiler; if death date is listed they died in Essweiler:

1.Herman Franck b:05/15/1831 d:09/23/1903 Essweiler, buried Hinzweiler Germany

Herman married Ester Moses on 05/10/1860 in Essweiler, daughter of Aaron Moses/Henrietta Dreifus in Nanzweiler, Germany b: 04/17/1837 d:12/19/1884 Essweiler

Ester gave birth to 12 children all in Essweiler:

Carolina Franck b: 05/05/1861

Sara Franck b: 09/09/1862 d: 1938 Kairserslautern, Germany
Josephine Frank b: 05/15/1864 d: 12/12/1872 Essweiler
Julius Franck b: 12/15/1865
Amalie Franck b:02/16/1868 d:12/14/1870 Essweiler
Aaron Franck b: 05/19/1870
Gustav Franck b: 06/30/1872
Bertha Franck b; 02/18/1874
Adolf Frank b: 10/13/1876
Auguste Franck b:07/08/1878 d: 07/05/1942 Arolsen, Germany
Theodore Franck b: 04/04/1880
Salomon Franck b: 02/12/1882

2.Josephina Franck b:12/25/1832 d:11/24/1837
3.Regina Franck b:01/18/1835 d: 09/14/1835
4.Julius Franck b: 08/30/1836 d: 12/14/1837
5.Henrietta Franck b:01/11/1838
6.Johannetta Franck b:09/12/1841
7.Ferdinand Franck b:04/24/1844 d: 07/19/1845
8.Emilia Franck b: 10/16/1846

3. Barbara Franck b: 10/22/1812, Marienthal, Germany (3rd Great Aunt)
d: 08/22/1893, Essweiler, Germany, buried Hinzweiler, Germany

Married Moses Franck on 04/12/1838, Essweiler, Germany, Moses son of Moses Feilder/Sara Wolf b:09/29/1793 in Pleisweiler, Germany d: 1893 in Brucken, Germany. Barbara is his 2nd wife….1st wife is Elizabetha Hammel after giving birth in 1837 her 7th child. She passed. Barbara would give birth to 2 children:

Josephina Franck b:02/04/1839, Essweiler no record of marriage/death as yet
Rosina Franck b: 1852 Brucken, Germany d: 05/31/1902 Essweiler, Germany

Joseph Franck married 2x….1st wife passed, whoever transcribed records for Family Search mixed 1st wife’s 1st name with 2nd wife’s last name really messing up the record but civil registry fortunately has it correct!

1st marriage: 7/27/1825 to Josephina Henrietta Weiner b:12/28/1801
d: 08/03/1831
Had 3 children all who died in Essweiler, Germany at less than 1 year of age

2nd marriage:02/23/1832 to Rosina Wolf b: 12/21/1811, Essweiler, Germany (3rd Great Grandmother)
d: 10/24/1866 , Essweiler, Germany

Rosina’s parents would also be one set of 4th Great Grandparents: Benjamin Wolf ll
Sara Becker

Rosina gave birth to 6 children:

1. Rosina Josephina Franck b:01/21/1834, Essweiler, Germany (2nd Great Grandmother)
d: 01/06/1893, Wallerfangen, Germany

She married Nathan Jakoby…2nd Great Grandfather (Jacoby of Barweiler, Germany)…date unk at this time.

She would give birth to 8 children…have name/dates/etc elsewhere….with husbands and children it would add another 30 people to tree

Her sisters/brother: 2x great aunts/uncles

2. Fany Franck b: 03/26/1835, Essweiler, Germany
d: 12/17/1835, Essweiler, Germany

3. Julius Franck b: 08/09/1836, Essweiler, Germnay
d: 01/14/1893, Essweiler, Germany have found no record of marriage as yet

4. Phipinna Franck b: 10/26/1838, Essweiler no record of marriage or death found to date

5. Susanna Franck b: 08/28/1840, Essweiler, Germnay
d: 10/27/1873, Essweiler, Germany

Susanna married Lazarus Jacob on 02/26/1873 b:04/27/1847 Tholey, Germany to Isak Jakob/Lisetta Oppenheimmer no death date given in Essweiler. Her Uncle Nathan Jacoby and brother Julius would be 2 of the 4 signatures on the marriage decree.
Susanna passed during child birth of her only child:

Joseph Jacob b: 10/27/1873 d: 10/27/1873 in Essweiler

6. Barbara Franck : 03/30/1844, Essweiler, Germany

Barbara would on 05/26/1874 marry Susanna’s widow Isak Jacob. She would give birth to 6 children and a still born all in Essweiler. Johanna is the only one I currently have a marriage record in Essweiler

1. Johanna Jacob b: 09/15/1874
2. Rosalia Jacob b: 11/24/1875

Johanna married on 10/24/1894 in Essweiler to Hugo Hertze son of Hert Hertze/Helen Leifgens b:07/29/1870 in Randerath, Germany.

Johanna gave birth to 3 children in Essweiler then no further information on her or Hugo passing…it was during this time that many of the Jewish faith were leaving Essweiler as the gov’t were now allowing them to move into larger cities.

Leo Hertze b: 07/17/1895
Adolph Hertze b: 12/13/1896, Adolph did marry in Essweiler to Rosa Lazar but no date given nor info on the bride or her parents
Arthur Hertze b: 08/16/1898

3.Ida Jacob b:10/22/1877
4. Flora Jacob b: 10/19/1879
5. Hedwig Jacob b:01/24/1882, married Silvian Geissiman 10/02/1912 in Kaiserslautern, Germany, b: 02/08/1882 in Westhoven, daughter of Issak Gerissman & Babette Picard, found no children or death dates as yet
6. Paulina Jacob b: 10/01/1884
7. Male Jacob b: 09/27/1889 d: 09/27/1889

Foster Talk w/Dr. John

Yesterday, July 14, 2014, I appeared as the guest for the Foster Talk with Dr. John radio show. He has made the link to the show available to me to share with others.

My portion of the hour long program includes my years in care then what has happened since those years.

I appreciated the invite and hope those who listen(ed) found it useful…especially youth in care today or those who have aged out and are struggling to overcome what difficulties they faced during their years in care.

Below is the link, if you feel you wish to contact me after listening please feel free to do so at larry@larrya.us

July 14: Larry Adams, foster care alumni, author, and advocate. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/drjohndegarmo/2014/07/14/foster-talk-with-dr-john

Thank you Dr. John for the invite!

Have a good day!

When Foster Care Goes Right

The entry below was not written by me. The other day I was looking at posts on Facebook. I was so moved by reading the post below that I asked the writer if I could share it on my blog as I felt it needed as wide as audience as possible. I am happy to sat she consented. Serena is a foster care alumni, a licensed social worker, Training Director at Oklahoma CASA Association and Self-employed at Independent Child Welfare Consultant & Training Specialist. Serena has taken all she experienced and learned while in foster care and has put it to use in helping others improve the foster care system…we need more like her! Here is her post:

One of the most memorable moments in my life occurred about 12-14years ago, now. I was telling my story to about 250 child welfare professionals from our state agency, private agencies, and the Courts in the county where I was now working in child welfare, so these people were my colleagues. This was also the exact same county where I’d grown up in foster care, so many of the people in that room had actually been involved with my own case, at one point or another. As I spoke, I had no idea how many people from my case were in that room and I definitely did not know that the Judge who had oversight over my case was in the room! As I told my story, I talked about the decisions that were made that continued to impact me, as an adult, and were also impacting my children. I talked about how the decisions made when I was 12 years old continued to play a huge role in my life. While I’ve never been super, uber angry with the system and, for the most part, recognize the huge opportunities that came my way to change my family tree, I will admit that some of these things continue to bug me.

And, then, the moment happened…

The Judge from my case, who I was now working with regularly, because I was working for our local CASA program, came up to the stage and took the microphone. He looked at me, and in front of all those 250 people, APOLOGIZED to me! He looked me dead in the eye and said “I’m sorry for the decisions we didn’t make for you. I’m sorry we didn’t do better for you. I’m sorry.”

As you can imagine, I was brought to tears and I felt a rush of emotion in that moment. Even though I was never angry at this person, or really angry at the system, I felt so incredibly honored that this man, whom I had admired my whole life because I knew the difficult decisions he was forced to make, would humble himself before me and apologize, in front of all our shared colleagues.

For all those social worker students, foster families, and other professionals who may be in this group: I promised myself, at that moment, that I would never take for granted the incredible responsibility of my position, as a social worker. I would never forget the power that was attached to my position, in terms of how much I could truly impact the life of another human being, in terms of how much I could personally impact entire family trees and future generations. The decisions we make TODAY do not stop impacting the children & families we serve when they leave our systems, when the cases close, or when they grow up. We impact EVERY SINGLE DAY of their lives, which means we MUST approach every single thing we do with care & attention to the responsibility we have. I encourage you to remember the levity of your positions, in every moment of your days, as well.

For those alums who are in this system, if you would allow me the chance to put on my social worker hat for a moment (knowing that I am your sister because I’ve lived this journey with you, in some small ways). I want to apologize to each of you, on behalf of all those people who made decisions over your lives at one point or another. I know not one single worker who will say the system is perfect or who will not admit we’ve made mistakes. We, typically, do the best we can, in the moment, but I know we don’t always get it right. Sometimes, we fail you miserably! For those failings, I am sorry – truly & deeply sorry.

I want you to know that we, as a system, are doing the best we can to improve how we do things. It’s slow coming and the changes are requiring a gigantic shift in the way we think about things, but I really believe we are learning. We are seeing more and more of our clients and former clients speak up to tell us the mistakes we’ve made and it is making a difference!

It will happen slowly, one worker at a time, but change is coming!!! I know because I have 10 students in my class and I’ve seen the change in each of them over the course of this semester. Yes, it’s only 10, but each of those 10 will share what they’ve learned with how many different people? These 10 will be better advocates for the children & families they serve. These 10 will inspire change in their co-workers and agencies!!! These 10 will spread the message!!!

You may read this post on Serena’s blog, as well as another moving entry:

http://whenfostercaregoesright.blogspot.com/2014/04/from-bottom-of-my-heart.html

http://whenfostercaregoesright.blogspot.com/2013/11/everything-i-needed-to-know-i-learned.html

Thank you for sharing yourself and your experiences Serena with others so we may learn and improve the lives of those in care. You are an example to us all!