Youth Aging Out of Care Increases 64% since 1999

There has been just as dramatic of an increase of youth aging out of foster care as there has been a decrease of youth in care. Since 1999 youth aging out has increased by almost 12,000 (in 99 there were roughly 17,000 & 2009 there were over 29,000).

Over a quarter of a million youth have aged out of foster care over the past 10 years (over 228,000).

Below is a link to an interesting article on this subject including data from each of the states.

My question is what is happening to these youth today?

3 Responses

  1. I wander how much of that has to do with parents of older children being allow to “throw children away” in to the system, as mine were allowed to do with me? They still seem to reflect on that time in my life as if I was in some state funded boarding school.

  2. […] by luvmyaka in Uncategorized There has been just as dramatic of an increase of youth aging out of foster care as there has been a decrease of youth in care. Since 1999 youth aging out has increased by almost 12,000 (in 99 there were roughly 17,000 & 2009 there were over 29,000). Over a quarter of a million youth have aged out of foster care over the past 10 years (over 228,000). Below is a link to an interesting article on this subject including data from each of the sta … Read More […]

  3. Hi Larry!

    I’m really wondering about possible unintended consequences of ASFA’s TPR requirements. I’ve been reviewing the files of a mother who lost a TPR appeal recently. She had one child before she was married, then another with her husband who adopted the first child. The marriage lasted a couple of years. There were plenty of CPS reports when the children were little, oddly the children were never removed–I say “oddly” because I really think CPS assessment is a major roll of the dice, given the families I know of who have, and who haven’t had kids removed. The mom (who has described her own family of origin as abusive, with widespread drug/alcohol problems) became increasingly involved with drugs, and eventually the kids were placed with her ex-husband, who by then had remarried–that family now had a blended family with several young kids, one (the new wife’s) who had autism. The mom was later charged with federal drug offenses and went to prison for a couple of years, where she was successful in treatment and began what has been a solid recovery along with completing her GED and taking every parenting and vocational class she could. In the meantime, the other household had trouble dealing with the husband’s adopted child, and eventually turned him over to social services. Although the plan was reunification, it didn’t happen–possibly (don’t know, haven’t met them) the challenges of this non-biologically related kid on top of the rest of their kids was too much. In the end, the dad voluntarily terminated his parental rights. Although the caseworker had identified reunification with the biological mom as an alternative, she never wrote a case plan for that, and limited mom’s contact with the child to a maximum of 2 letters a month, no phone calls. The caseworker stated the foster parents were interested in adopting. But over time the child had recurring mental health issues and was hospitalized a number of times. At the time of the TPR decision, he had been placed in an out of state residential facility (just 10 years old). He’s now been there for a year. His sibling remains with the dad (who is the sibling’s biological father). It is not clear from the court records (including the appeals records) how likely foster parent adoption is. A district judge who reviewed the TPR didn’t agree with the ref’s decision, because the dad and then the social worker had cut off contact by the mom, and she had not been given the opportunity yet to demonstrate her ability to rebuild a relationship with her son (she was released from halfway house just after TPR trial took place, and had never been allowed visits).
    I guess I am wondering whether the goal of permanency will have the opposite outcome for the child. He’s had two fathers surrender rights voluntarily, while the mom who has fought to retain rights and has completely turned around her own life has been terminated by the courts. Meanwhile, the kid lives in an institution, which surely decreases the likelihood of adoption.

    Some states allow for reinstatement of parental rights when a period of time has gone by and the child still has not been adopted. In those states the petition has to be brought by the child–this is a precaution against parents disrupting the child’s life.

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